Women of South Sudan

Life brought my curiosity far far away towards many edges. Those edges always marked the line that I needed to cross in order to learn thousands of new things. The multitude of positive and negative facts about the world comes with many responsibilities. Before we open those boxes filled with answers about the world, we never ask ourselves an important question: Are we really ready to open it?

The answer to that question isn’t always clear due to our craved curiosity. And it’s fine. It’s fine for all those times when you learn about how amazing and pretty our world is…

It’s less fine or more so, it’s sad, when we open a box filled with negative information about the things wrong in the world…

In that moment, you realize that you are probably one of 7.2 billionth persons in the world. This fact makes you wonder if you’re the one that has to do something in order to resolve those issues the world is struggling to fix.

It is in that moment when you might start following your doubts and saying to yourself that you are too small for a huge cause like that…

And here we are.

I opened that box and I assimilated one of the many negative things that are happening in our world.

What was going on in my thoughts in that moment?

Even if I am too small for a huge and dangerous cause, I decided that by simply doing something small it might make a difference.

Today I hope that the small actions in my words could be read by those who can really make a huge difference and be a source of influence for them to change the negative into positive.

The women of South Sudan

A few days ago I had the opportunity to watch a video about a woman. She’s one of those 7.2 billion people who live on our planet. She’s too small for a huge problem like that. And here’s where we forgot something important:

“People working together can do great things.” – Tanzanian proverb

 Ileana is only 28 years old. She didn’t choose to become a famous singer or professional dancer. She didn’t even choose to stay in her home country to do what she studied (helping women give life – Obstetrician). With the idea of somehow making the difference, she picked one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.

What could that be?

She decided to join Doctors Without Borders and do small acts of kindness.

How?

It’s simple. Many small acts by many people, working together, will make a lasting difference.

It was when I discovered Ileana in a YouTube video, that I decided to do something in order to help the world repair the negative knowledge-box full of bad facts that happen not too far from here.

Ileana decided to go help normal people at their house during the war. Let’s read how it sounds when we decide that it is better to help people in their own house instead of giving them shelter in our homes here, far from the war.

donne sud sudan
photo: iodonna.it

“Tra un esplosione ed un altra mi chiedevo cosa pensassero le donne incinte…

Spesso mi capita di sentire storie di donne che camminano per ore per raggiungerci. Alcune c’e la fanno ad arrivarci qui in ospedale, pero alcune volte non c’e la fanno. Crollano esauste e partoriscono da sole con nessuno che le dia una mano. Hanno solo un pezzo di lamiera per tagliare il cordone ombelicale e nessuno che le aiuti a ad espellere la placenta.

 Questo fatto mi porta tristemente in mente la situazione delle donne del Sud Sudan che di notte si nascondono nelle palludi per proteggersi sai soldati. Devono tenere i bambini in braccio, quelli piccoli, perche l’acqua arriva fino alle spalle. Con il rischio di essere attaccate dai serpenti e dai coccodrilli. Sono donne esauste, mal nitrite eppure fortissime.

Quello che ho visto in questi anni e quello che nonostante le difficolta che queste mamme sono costrette a vivere in guerra, dopo il parto, la prima espressione che vedi sul loro volto e di tutte le persone che stanno intorno e sempre di gioia. Gioia perche e nato un bambino nuovo, una vita nuova ed una vita nuova da una speranza per tutti.

 Sapete, mi chiedono spesso se non ho paura di andare li e cosa mi spinge a farlo?

Rispondo sempre che qui a casa abbiamo dei bisogni ma anche se non ci rendiamo conto, abiamo molte risorse per soddisfarli. Mentre la ci sono solo bisogni.”

 

I will try to translate it from Italian to English for you.

“Between explosions I always asked to myself how the women were feeling in those moments.

 Many times I heard how these women walk for hours to reach us. Most of them make it here, but sometimes many women fall literally on the ground exhausted and they deliver their babies alone. Nobody is there to help them and all they have is a piece of sheet metal, which they use to cut the umbilical cord. Nobody is there for them in order to help them to excrete the placentas.

SudSudan-Pibor
photo:medicisenzafrontiere.it

This fact sadly reminds me of the women from South Sudan. During the night they hide in the swamp in order to escape from the soldiers. They hold the little children because the water reaches the shoulders. They risk to be attacked by snakes and crocodiles. They are exhausted and underfed women but strong.

South Sudan Stranded Families
photo: ilpost.it

 All I saw during these years is that despite the difficulties and issues all these women are going through because of the war, after the birth of their child, they always have an expression on their faces. The first expression you can see on their faces is happiness. They’re happy because a new baby was born. A new life always brings hope for everybody.

 

Women and children at the MSF hospital in Leer.
photo: internet

Very often people ask me if I am afraid of going over to these places and risk my life. They also ask me why and what makes me go there..

I always reply: here, in our house we have needs. Many times we don’t even realize how many resources we have in order to fix the need. Over there are only needs…”

 

Thank you Ileana for what you’re doing! I hope though, that one day, we all work together and make the dreams of peace for all these South Sudanese and other women come true…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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